FAQs - General Information

The Electronic Campus is a gateway to e-learning opportunities and online services designed to meet the unique needs of adult learners who want to start, continue or complete their education. Individuals can search thousands of courses and hundreds of programs offered by colleges and universities across the 16 SREB states.

 

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Through the Electronic Campus, students can:

  • learn about educational opportunities;
  • select the learning opportunities that best match their needs and characteristics;
  • plan to meet admission requirements for campuses or e-learning opportunities;
  • understand financial aid eligibility and opportunities for adults and e-learners;
  • select an educational program as part of career planning;
  • research and enroll in e-learning opportunities through participating colleges and universities; and
  • quickly and easily search thousands of courses and hundreds of degree programs.

Whether a midcareer professional, working single parent, “late-bloomer” or senior citizen, the Electronic Campus creates new learning opportunities — and easier access to those opportunities — for more than one-third of Americans living in the SREB region.

All courses and programs are offered by accredited colleges and universities in the SREB states and meet the Principles of Good Practice developed by the Electronic Campus. The acceptance of credits and the use of credits for program requirements are governed by the college or university to which the credits are being transferred. You should consult the college or university for specific policies about credit transfer. All programs and courses have been reviewed by the participating colleges and universities against a common standard, the Principles of Good Practice, developed by the Electronic Campus. The Electronic Campus does not control the policies and procedures of individual colleges or universities, but it does require participating colleges and universities to provide prospective students with information on enrollment and tuition.

The Academic Common Market/Electronic Campus allows students in SREB states to enroll in uncommon online degree programs outside their home states — at in-state tuition rates. Close to 90 degree programs are available, and about 130 students were certified for study during the past year.

The first step in registering for any course offered in our catalog is to contact the institution offering the course. The course contact information is listed with the course information and the name of the institution is linked to the institution's contact information. Some decisions to make:

  • Are you planning on taking several courses from this institution or just one?
  • Does the institution offer special student registration for those interested in only taking a couple of courses (up to 12 hours) and not completely transferring to the institution?
  • What are the rules of your home institution?
The institution that offers the course determines the tuition cost. The cost for each course or program is listed on the course description page. Most courses charge out-of-state tuition if you are not a resident of the offering institution's state. SREB has promoted among participating colleges and universities the establishment of a single tuition rate-electronic tuition rate-and courses available at the single rate are designated with an "E" in the cost column.

The acceptance of credits and the use of credits for program requirements are governed by the college or university to which the credits are being transferred. You should consult the college or university for specific policies about credit transfer. All programs and courses have been reviewed by the participating colleges and universities against a common standard, the Principles of Good Practice, developed by the Electronic Campus. The Electronic Campus does not control the policies and procedures of individual colleges or universities, but it does require participating colleges and universities to provide prospective students with information on enrollment and tuition.

Yes, if you meet recognized general requirements (e.g. have a high school diploma or GED to take an undergraduate level course and a bachelor's degree to take a graduate level course) and meet any prerequisite requirements. You would not, for example, be allowed to take an advanced course if you had no earlier coursework, say to take an advanced accounting course if you have not taken introductory accounting. If you are trying to complete a degree program, you need to make sure your home institution will accept the credit and that the course will meet whatever requirement you are seeking to fulfill.
  • Discussion: You will be asked to spend time participating in online discussions with the instructor and the other students. These discussions, in which you will respond to other students' comments, play a central role in the learning experiences. Students who might find raising their hand in an in-class discussion difficult, find it easier in an online course to participate in discussions. 
  • Team projects: You may also be asked to participate in team projects. Team members will rely on you to participate and contribute to the projects. 
  • Homework: You will be expected to do the same amount of homework you might do in a face-to-face class. You are responsible for keeping up with the workload so that you can be an active participant in online discussions. An online course is an unique opportunity to meld your individual learning pace and style with a structured course timeline. 
  • Stay Current: Unlike the situation in most face-to-face courses, where you attend class, listen to lectures, and perhaps not play an active role in discussion, the assignments in the online courses require your participation. Keeping up with reading and other homework is very important. It will be harder for you to contribute meaningful, timely comments to the online discussions if you fall behind. By setting aside specific times each week for engaging in course participation activities you can stay on top of the course work.

A good rule of thumb is to log on at least daily to check announcements and review online materials The following lists illustrate examples of tasks you will conduct online and off-line:

  • Online tasks:
    • finding and printing assignments and lecture notes
    • reading or downloading online resources such as library materials & websites
    • e-mail interaction with professor
    • online discussion groups or e-mail exchange with other enrolled student
  • Off-line tasks:
    • reading assignments, textbooks, articles, etc.
    • working on problems
    • synthesizing materials and crafting outlines
    • writing papers (that can be attached to e-mail upon completion or submitted via your online assignment portal)